Home Architecture Metropolis Preserving the Morton Salt Shed

Metropolis Preserving the Morton Salt Shed






For nearly 100 years, the Morton Salt advanced at 1357 North Elston Avenue, has been welcoming commuters to downtown Chicago.  Now town landmark with a decrease case “l” is changing into an official Metropolis Landmark, with an uppercase “L.”  

The Morton Salt complex, before the eastern shed was torn down last year (via Apple Maps)
The Morton Salt advanced, earlier than the japanese shed was torn down final yr (by way of Apple Maps)

This coming Thursday (March 4, 2021), the Fee on Chicago Landmarks will take into account making the neighborhood icon a everlasting a part of town’s panorama.  The transfer is expounded to the just lately permitted $30 million plan we told you about last month to transform the salt shed and different buildings into an leisure venue.

Apart from the nostalgic portray of Sally Salt Spiller on the roof, why ought to this constructing develop into a landmark?  In accordance with the Chicago Division of Planning and Growth:

  • It’s “one of the vital iconic industrial websites alongside the North department of the Chicago River.”
  • It “exemplifies the significance of salt manufacturing in Chicago’s historical past.”
  • “The advanced is important inside the higher North Department industrial hall.”
  • It was designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White.  In the event you don’t know who they’re, get thee to the Chicago Structure Heart proper pronto.


Location: 1357 North Elston Avenue, Goose Island


Writer: Editor

Editor based the Chicago Structure Weblog in 2003, after a protracted profession in journalism. He might be reached at [email protected]

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